Faculty

Summer 2017

Participant_Bush_175x220

Drew Bush
 PhD Candidate, Department of Geography & School of Environment

Teaching: Environmental Science

A guest scientist at the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, NY, Drew Bush is working to complete his McGill University doctoral dissertation in the Department of Geography and School of Environment. His research examines how inquiry-based teaching using a classroom adapted NASA-GISS global climate model (GCM) impacts student learning of climate change science. He has started the Be A Climate Modeler For A Week summer camp at McGill, conducted educational research at John Abbott College in Montreal, QC, and taught environmental studies students at New York University in New York, NY.

AshleyHamilton

Ashley Hamilton
Assistant Professor of Theatre, University of Denver

Teaching: Devising Social Justice Theatre: A Practice and Reflection

Ashley has worked as a professor in Speech, Communication, Theatre, and Educational/Applied Theatre at New York University (NYU), City University of New York (CUNY), NYU’s Prison Educational Program and NYACKS Prison Education Program. Ashley is now an Assistant Professor of Theatre at the University of Denver (DU) where she is starting a brand new prison arts program. Ashley’s interests include creating theatre and rich communication in both traditional educational spaces and also non-normative communities such as maximum and medium security prisons and in various global spaces. She is also in the process of becoming a registered drama therapist (RDT). Her research focuses on the complexities of creating theatre in women’s maximum security prisons and how this form of theatre can be used as a resource for lasting rehabilitation. Ashley is also the co-found of (Re)Emergent Theatre, a theatre company for men and women coming home from prison.

image.img.320.high (1)

Sara Franklin
Faculty, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Teaching: Writing I: America, A Place

Sara Franklin is an oral historian and journalist whose work focuses on food and agriculture and its ties to popular culture, media, performance of gender, care and identity. Her areas of interest include examining food and agriculture through the lenses of food, memory, oral history, narrative studies, dialogical analysis, embodied knowledge and skill, media studies, care work, domesticity and include forms of storytelling including biography/profile, memoir, autoethnography, and audio production. Sara has a background in sustainable agriculture, anti-hunger activism, hands-on food production, food journalism and food-related education and capacity building. She seeks to bring diverse storytelling and analysis tools to bear on the the universal topic of food in order to help frame it in both contemporary and historical contexts. Her doctoral research is based in oral history and uses methods drawn from several disciplines to examine the life of Knopf senior editor Judith Jones with special attention to her impact on conceptions of womanhood and self, cooking in the public sphere, and American food culture and culinary publishing. She has farmed in Massachusetts and New York, has spent time working with agricultural and culinary activists in South Africa and Brazil, and was an assistant content manager for the “Our Global Kitchens” exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History (2012-2013). She has written, produced multi-media and conducted interviews for a number of print and online publications including Cook ‘n Scribble, ZesterDaily, Gastronomica, Global Post, Southern Cultures, The Valley Advocate, Guernica, Freerange Non-Fiction, Downeast.com, Diner Journal, Gravy, and Brooklyn-Based.

APaty_2016

Allyson Paty
Gallatin Writing Program Assistant Director

Teaching: Not-for-credit: Creating a Publication

Allyson Paty is a poet whose writing has appeared in publications including Boston Review, Kenyon Review, Tin House, The Literary Review, The Brooklyn Rail, Best New Poets, and the PEN America Poetry Series. She is the author of two chapbooks, most recently, Score Poems (Present Tense Pamphlets, 2016). She is a founding editor of Singing Saw Press, a fine arts and poetry publisher, and she is co-curator of Earshot, a monthly reading series in Brooklyn. As Gallatin’s Writing Program Assistant Director, Allyson helps to plan and facilitate Writing Program events, serves as an editorial and visual consultant for The Literacy Review and The Gallatin Review, and oversees Confluence, an online platform for student writing, art, and research. She earned an MFA from NYU’s Creative Writing Program, where she was a Starworks Fellow and served as Editor in Chief of Washington Square Review.

Aurora-Wallace

Aurora Wallace
Clinical Associate Professor of Media, Culture and Communication

Teaching – Social Foundations II: Introduction to Media Studies

Aurora Wallace is the author of Media Capital: Architecture and Communication in New York City (University of Illinois Press, 2012), Newspapers and the Making of Modern America (2005), as well as articles in Journalism History, Philosophy and Geography, Space and Culture, Environmental Values. She has written about crime and media in the anthology Punishment in Popular Culture (NYU Press, 2015) the Journal of Visual Culture, and Crime, Media, Culture. She received her PhD from McGill University and was a Fulbright Scholar from 1998-2000. She is a professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.


 

Spring 2017

Gianpaolo_Baiocchi

Gianpaolo Baiocchi
Associate Professor, Faculty Director of the Urban Democracy Lab, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught: Social Foundations I: The Right to the City: Urban Struggles in a Globalizing World

Gianpaolo Baiocchi is a sociologist and an ethnographer interested in questions of politics and culture, critical social theory, and cities. He has written about and continues to research instances of actually existing civic life and participatory democracy. While much of his research and writing has been about Brazil, his most recent book, The Civic Imagination (co-authored with Elizabeth Bennett, Alissa Cordner, Stephanie Savell, and Peter Klein) examines the contours and limits of the democratic conversation in the US today. His most recent research, with Ernesto Ganuza, has been about the global travel and translation of blueprints of urban participation in the current era. An engaged scholar, Baiocchi was one of the founders of the Participatory Budgeting Project and continues to work with groups improving urban democracy. He heads Gallatin’s Urban Democracy Lab, which launched in 2014 and which provides a space for scholars and practitioners to collaborate and exchange ideas for cultivating just, sustainable, and creative urban futures.

Dolly
Dolly Chugh
Associate Professor of Management and Organizations, Stern School of Business

Course Taught: Elective: Leadership Skills

Dolly Chugh is an award-winning professor at the New York University Stern School of Business.  She studies unintended forms of unethical behavior and bias, known as “bounded ethicality” and teaches MBA courses in leadership, management, and negotiations. Since, 2008, Dolly has also taught for KIPP, working with regional and school leaders at various points in the leadership pipeline.  Prior to becoming an academic, Dolly worked in consulting, banking, and publishing. Dolly received a B.A. from Cornell University where she earned a double major in Psychology and Economics and served as a two-time co-captain of the Varsity Tennis Team (1990), an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School (1994), and a PhD in Organizational Behavior / Social Psychology from Harvard University (2006).  She is currently writing a book (forthcoming by HarperCollins) tentatively titled The Person You Mean to Be:  How to Overcome Unconscious Bias to Build a Better Workplace and World.

chase

Chase Madar
Lawyer and Writer

Course Taught: Social Foundations II: Criminalization and Its Discontents

Chase Madar is the author of The Passion of Chelsea Manning: The Story behind the Wikileaks Whistleblower (Verso, 2013). His journalism has appeared in the New York Times, the London Review of Books, Le Monde diplomatique, The American Conservative (where he is a contributing editor), Jacobin, The Nation and the London Times Literary Supplement. A former civil rights lawyer, he was a staff attorney for five years at Make the Road New York where he provided direct legal services in a variety of spheres and conducted larger advocacy projects in school security reform and against transgender employment discrimination. He has lectured widely from Oxford and Cambridge to San Diego State and the Mississippi State Capitol.

headshot

Michael Ralph
Associate Professor of Social & Cultural Analysis

Course Taught: Cultural Foundations II: Value of Life

Michael Ralph is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University, where he is the Director of the Metropolitan Studies program and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Michael’s research is concerned with citizenship and sovereignty, forensics, capital, and political aesthetics in the Atlantic world, Senegal, and the US South. He is the recipient of fellowships from the EHESS (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales), the Social Science Research Council, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study, the ACLS (American Council for Learned Societies), Cornell University’s Society for the Humanities, NYU’s Humanities Initiative, and Harvard’s Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History. Michael is the author of the University of Chicago Press book, Forensics of Capital. He has published in Disability Studies Quarterly, Souls, Social Text, Public Culture, South Atlantic Quarterly, the Journal of the History of Sport, and Transforming Anthropology. Michael serves on the editorial boards of Sport in Society and Disability Studies Quarterly. He is a member of the Social Text Editorial Collective and the Souls Editorial Working Group. Michael is Editor-in-Chief of Transforming Anthropology, the flagship journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists.


Fall 2016

Appuhn20112

Karl Appuhn
Associate Professor of History, Italian; Director, Medieval and Renaissance Center

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations III: Machiavelli

Karl Appuhn’s research examines the relationship between humans and non-human nature in early modern Italy. He is most interested in the ways that technical and scientific expertise helped individuals and institutions make sense of the connections between society and nature. He has written about forest and water management in Renaissance Venice, and is currently working on a history of veterinary medicine in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Italy, which examines the connection between widespread zoonotic diseases (especially bovine diseases), changes in the Italian diet, and the establishment of veterinary medicine as an academic discipline at the University of Padua. He is also writing a general environmental history of early modern Europe.

ElaineFreedgood
Elaine Freedgood
Professor of English; Director of Graduate Doctoral Admissions

Course Taught – Writing I: Empire at Sea

I’m interested in the research imagination; archives broadly conceived–from letters in a box in a library to desk drawers, buildings, databases, landfills, and landscapes; peculiar histories of the novel; figures of prose like metonymy and metalepsis; contemporary global fiction; critical theory, especially Marxist, postcolonial and queer; Conceptual poetry, prose and visual art. Victorian Writing about Risk: Imagining a Safe England in a Dangerous World (Cambridge 2000) and The Ideas in Things: Fugitive Meaning in the Victorian Novel (Chicago 2006) are my books; my current project is called Worlds Enough: Fictionality and Reference in the Novel.

Livingston4-1

Julie Livingston
Professor of History and Social & Cultural Analysis

Course Taught – Social Foundations II/III: What is Cancer? History, Politics, and Experience

Julie Livingston is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University.  She is interested in the human body as a moral condition and mode of consciousness, in care as a social practice, and in taxonomy and relationships that upend or complicate it.  Her work is at the intersection of history, anthropology, and public health.  Her books include Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic (Duke U Press, 2012), Debility and the Moral Imagination in Botswana (Indiana U Press, 2005).  Livingston is the recipient of the Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing (2013), the Royal Anthropological Institute’s Wellcome Medal (2012), the American Association for the History of Medicine William Welch Medal (2014) and the MacArthur Fellowship (2013-2018).

Julia Mendoza
Department of Social and Cultural Analysis

Course Taught – Writing I: Stories of Racial Formation

Julia Mendoza is a fourth year doctoral student in the American Studies program. Prior to coming to NYU, Julia obtained her law degree from UC Davis and a master’s degree in Human Rights from Columbia University. Julia thereupon worked at the ACLU of Northern California in the Racial Justice Project as a legal fellow. During her fellowship she worked on two advocacy campaigns that utilized a combination of legal and legislative advocacy, public education, and organizing strategies to address racial disparities within public schools and felon disenfranchisement. She is continuing her advocacy by using research as a tool to address the problems and issues confronting urban public schools and educational programs within prisons/jails. During the summer, she enjoys returning to the Bay Area to teach at San Quentin State Prison for the Prison University Project.


 Summer 2016

Piper_Anderson

Piper Anderson
Part-time Faculty, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Foundations of Speech Communications

Piper Anderson is a community artist, writer, educator, and healing practitioner. In 2014 she founded Create Forward, which specializes in cultivating creative strategies for social change sourced from collective radical imagination. She previously served as Blackout Arts Collective’s Lyrics on Lockdown National Tour Coordinator and directed the cultural campaign that reached more than twenty-five U.S communities creatively catalyzing a dialogue about the impact of the prison industrial complex. Lyrics on Lockdown is now a course at NYU, taught by Anderson, where the mission has become to inspire the next generation of leaders to be advocates for justice. In 2014 she co-founded, SpreadMassLOVE.com to generate critical community dialogue on love in the era of mass incarceration. Her writings have been featured in ForHarriet.com, Huffington Post and four books: How To Get Stupid White Men Out Of Office(2004), Growing Up Girl: Voices from Marginalized Spaces (2006), Conscious Women Rock the Page (2008), and Love, Race, and Liberation (2010).

AshleyHamilton

Ashley Hamilton
Assistant Professor of Theatre, University of Denver

Course Taught: Interpersonal Communication

Ashley has worked as a professor in Speech, Communication, Theatre, and Educational/Applied Theatre at New York University (NYU), City University of New York (CUNY), NYU’s Prison Educational Program and NYACKS Prison Education Program. Ashley is now an Assistant Professor of Theatre at the University of Denver (DU) where she is starting a brand new prison arts program. Ashley’s interests include creating theatre and rich communication in both traditional educational spaces and also non-normative communities such as maximum and medium security prisons and in various global spaces. She is also in the process of becoming a registered drama therapist (RDT). Her research focuses on the complexities of creating theatre in women’s maximum security prisons and how this form of theatre can be used as a resource for lasting rehabilitation. Ashley is also the co-found of (Re)Emergent Theatre, a theatre company for men and women coming home from prison.

Andrew_Ross

 Andrew Ross
Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis

Course Taught – Social Foundations III: Advanced Seminar in Urbanism

Andrew Ross writes on labor, the urban environment, and the organization of work. Making use of social theory as well as ethnography, his writing sharply questions the human and environmental cost of economic growth. The author or editor of more than twenty books, including Creditocracy and the Case for Debt Refusal, Bird On Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, and Nice Work if you Can Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times. His writing has also appeared in the New York Times, Artforum, The Nation, Newsweek and The Village Voice.

lauriewoodard

Laurie Woodard
Visiting Assistant Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations I/II: History and Memory in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Laurie Woodard began her professional life as a dancer with the Dance Theater of Harlem. She completed her BA in History at Columbia University and her Ph. D in History and African American Studies at Yale University. Her teaching interests include identity formation and representation, cultural studies, gender studies, and African American history, literature, and culture. She has taught classes at Columbia University, Pratt Institute, The New School, Wesleyan University, and Yale University. Her research focuses upon the intersection between the cultural and political realms and employs interdisciplinary methodologies, drawing from history, performance studies, critical race theory, and women and gender studies. She was the recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities Schomburg Scholar-in-Residence Fellowship (2008) and the Sylvia Arden Boone Prize (2007). She is currently completing a manuscript on the life and work of performing artist and civil rights activist Fredi Washington.


Spring 2016

 

AndrewBell

Andrew R. Bell
Assistant Professor​, Environmental Studies

Course Taught – Environmental Systems Science

Andrew Bell (Ph.D. 2010, Michigan) was a Research Fellow in the Environment and Production Technology Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC. His current research portfolio focuses on the use of field instruments – such as discrete choice experiments, framed field experiments, randomized control trials – to inform behavior in agent-based models of coupled human-natural systems. Prior to this post, Andrew was a post-doctoral research fellow at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he focused on developing applications for paleo-climate histories.

Ding PEP Photo 2016

Chinnie Ding
Clinical Assistant Professor​, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Writing II: Working

Chinnie Ding​’s areas of teaching and research encompass labor, poetry, Asia, cinema, and the arts. Her literary scholarship has been published in Forum for Modern Language Studies​ and ​SEL: Studies in English Literature​. Her writings on art appear in Artforum, ArtAsiaPacific, The Believer​, ​Border Crossings, ​Flaunt, and ​Sensate. She holds a BA in Literature from Yale​​, and ​this spring will receive a PhD in English ​from Harvard, where ​her literary criticism ​was awarded the Bowdoin Prize, Boston Ruskin Prize, and two Helen Choate Bell Prizes.​ Prior to joining the Gallatin faculty she taught in the Literature Concentration and the Core Curriculum at Harvard.

GabeBP_Spring16

Gabe Heller
Senior Lecturer in the Expository Writing Program

Course Taught – Writing II: Forms of Change

Gabriel Heller is a Senior Lecturer in the Expository Writing Program. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in AGNI Online, The Best American Nonrequired Reading, Electric Literature, Fence, The Gettysburg Review, The Stranger, Witness, and other publications. He is the recipient of the 14th Annual Inkwell Short Story Award. Prior to teaching at NYU, he taught GED classes at a public school on Rikers Island.

  George_Shulman
George Shulman
Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations I: Political Theology

George Shulman’s interests lie in the fields of political thought and American studies. He teaches and writes on political thought in Europe and the United States, as well as on Greek and Hebrew traditions. His teaching and writing emphasize the role of narrative in culture and politics. He is the author of Radicalism and Reverence: Gerrard Winstanley and the English Revolution and American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture (2008). His most recent book, American Prophecy, was awarded the David Easton Prize in political theory. Focusing on the language that great American critics have used to engage the racial domination at the center of American history, American Prophecy explores the relationship of prophecy and race to American nationalism and democratic politics. Professor Shulman is a recipient of the 2003 NYU Distinguished Teaching Award.


Fall 2015

 ElaineFreedgood
Elaine Freedgood
Professor of English; Director of Graduate Doctoral Admissions

Course Taught – Writing I: Empire at Sea

I’m interested in the research imagination; archives broadly conceived–from letters in a box in a library to desk drawers, buildings, databases, landfills, and landscapes; peculiar histories of the novel; figures of prose like metonymy and metalepsis; contemporary global fiction; critical theory, especially Marxist, postcolonial and queer; Conceptual poetry, prose and visual art. Victorian Writing about Risk: Imagining a Safe England in a Dangerous World (Cambridge 2000) and The Ideas in Things: Fugitive Meaning in the Victorian Novel (Chicago 2006) are my books; my current project is called Worlds Enough: Fictionality and Reference in the Novel.

Julia Mendoza
Department of Social and Cultural Analysis

Course Taught – Writing I: Stories of Racial Formations

Julia Mendoza is a fourth year doctoral student in the American Studies program. Prior to coming to NYU, Julia obtained her law degree from UC Davis and a master’s degree in Human Rights from Columbia University. Julia thereupon worked at the ACLU of Northern California in the Racial Justice Project as a legal fellow. During her fellowship she worked on two advocacy campaigns that utilized a combination of legal and legislative advocacy, public education, and organizing strategies to address racial disparities within public schools and felon disenfranchisement. She is continuing her advocacy by using research as a tool to address the problems and issues confronting urban public schools and educational programs within prisons/jails. During the summer, she enjoys returning to the Bay Area to teach at San Quentin State Prison for the Prison University Project.

kristin-ross

Kristin Ross
Professor of Comparative Literature

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations II: Island Literature

Professor Ross is the author of The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune (1988), French translation 2012. Her next book, Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture (1995) was awarded a Critic’s Choice Award and the Lawrence Wylie Award for French Cultural Studies,and was published in a French translation in 1997. She is co-editor of a special issue of Yale French Studies on “everyday life” (1987) and is on the editorial board of French Cultural Studies, Sites, and Parallax. As translator she has published an English version of Jacques Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster. She is author of numerous articles on debates within French social theory and cultural studies,and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a fellowship from the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. Her most recent book, May ’68 and its Afterlives (Chicago, 2002), has been translated into French, Spanish, and Japanese. A collection of essays on Anti-Americanism, co-edited with Andrew Ross, was published by NYU Press (2004).

 Aurora-Wallace
Aurora Wallace
Clinical Associate Professor of Media, Culture and Communication

Course Taught – Social Foundations II: Introduction to Media Studies

Aurora Wallace is the author of Media Capital: Architecture and Communication in New York City (University of Illinois Press, 2012), Newspapers and the Making of Modern America (2005), as well as articles in Journalism History, Philosophy and Geography, Space and Culture, Environmental Values. She has written about crime and media in the anthology Punishment in Popular Culture (NYU Press, 2015) the Journal of Visual Culture, and Crime, Media, Culture. She received her PhD from McGill University and was a Fulbright Scholar from 1998-2000. She is a professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.

 


Summer 2015

 
Piper Anderson
Part-time Faculty, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Foundations of Speech Communications

Piper Anderson is a community artist, writer, educator, and healing practitioner. In 2014 she founded Create Forward, which specializes in cultivating creative strategies for social change sourced from collective radical imagination. She previously served as Blackout Arts Collective’s Lyrics on Lockdown National Tour Coordinator and directed the cultural campaign that reached more than twenty-five U.S communities creatively catalyzing a dialogue about the impact of the prison industrial complex. Lyrics on Lockdown is now a course at NYU, taught by Anderson, where the mission has become to inspire the next generation of leaders to be advocates for justice. In 2014 she co-founded, SpreadMassLOVE.com to generate critical community dialogue on love in the era of mass incarceration. Her writings have been featured in ForHarriet.com, Huffington Post and four books: How To Get Stupid White Men Out Of Office(2004), Growing Up Girl: Voices from Marginalized Spaces (2006), Conscious Women Rock the Page (2008), and Love, Race, and Liberation (2010).

Jeff-Manza

Jeff Manza
Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology

Course Taught – Introduction to Sociology

Jeff Manza (Ph.D University of California – Berkeley, 1995) is Professor of Sociology, and the former Chair (2009-12) of the Department of Sociology at New York University. Before coming to NYU, he taught at Penn State (1996-98) and Northwestern (1998-2007). His teaching and research interests lay at the intersection of inequality, political sociology, and public policy. His research has examined how different types of social identities and inequalities influence political processes such as voting behavior, partisanship, and public opinion (at both the macro and micro level). In collaboration with Christopher Uggen, he has been involved in a long-term project that has examined the causes and consequences of felon disenfranchisement in the United States; their bookLocked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy (Oxford University Press 2006) is the standard work on the topic. Manza is the co-author of three books with Clem Brooks (of Indiana University): Social Cleavages and Political Change (Oxford University Press, 1999), a study of the changing social demography of the American electorate and its partisan consequences; an analysis of the comparative impact of public opinion on welfare state effort in the OECD democracies entitled Why Welfare States Persist (University of Chicago Press, 2007); and most recently Whose Rights?: Counterterrorism and the Dark Side of American Public Opinion (Russell Sage Foundation Press, 2013), an examination of the sources and persistence of public support for harsh counterterrorism policies that highlights the role of American national identity in shaping individual attitudes. In addition to his books, Manza’s work has appeared in numerous scientific journals in several disciplines, including the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Sociological Theory, Public Opinion Quarterly, and the Journal of Politics, as well as newspapers and general interest magazines. He is currently completing a book (with Clem Brooks) that interrogates the surprisingly limited impact of rising inequality on the attitudes and policy preferences of Americans, and they are also working on a series of papers drawing from survey experiments they designed and implemented to better understand the role of national identity in shaping attitudes towards racial and ethnic outgroups.

 

 Andrew_Ross
 Andrew Ross
Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis

Course Taught – Approaches to American Studies

Andrew Ross writes on labor, the urban environment, and the organization of work. Making use of social theory as well as ethnography, his writing sharply questions the human and environmental cost of economic growth. The author or editor of more than twenty books, including Creditocracy and the Case for Debt Refusal, Bird On Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, and Nice Work if you Can Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times. His writing has also appeared in the New York Times, Artforum, The Nation, Newsweek and The Village Voice.

 

 lauriewoodard
Laurie Woodard
Visiting Assistant Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Identity and the Cultural Constructions of Race and Ethnicity

Laurie Woodard began her professional life as a dancer with the Dance Theater of Harlem. She completed her BA in History at Columbia University and her Ph. D in History and African American Studies at Yale University. Her teaching interests include identity formation and representation, cultural studies, gender studies, and African American history, literature, and culture. She has taught classes at Columbia University, Pratt Institute, The New School, Wesleyan University, and Yale University. Her research focuses upon the intersection between the cultural and political realms and employs interdisciplinary methodologies, drawing from history, performance studies, critical race theory, and women and gender studies. She was the recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities Schomburg Scholar-in-Residence Fellowship (2008) and the Sylvia Arden Boone Prize (2007). She is currently completing a manuscript on the life and work of performing artist and civil rights activist Fredi Washington.


Spring 2015

 
Bryonn Bain
2015 Visiting Associate Professor, Artist in Residence, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations I: Critical Perspective on Justice Through Creative Writing

Bryonn Bain is a prison activist, spoken word poet, hip hop artist, actor, author, and educator. Cornel West has described him as an artist who “speaks his truth with a power we desperately need to hear.” He has lectured and performed at over 100 colleges and correctional facilities in the U.S., Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. After launching the Lyrics on Lockdown national campaign, he helped to create the university course by the same name to link students at Rikers Island prison to NYU, The New School, and Columbia. Bryonn has performed the hip hop theater/spoken word production “Lyrics from Lockdown” (executive produced by Gina and Harry Belafonte) for sold-out theaters on three continents. A Nuyorican Grand Slam Poetry Champion, Bryonn ranked #1 in the nation and placed second in the world during the 2000 International Poetry Slam. Having taught courses on hip hop, spoken word, and the prison crisis at Brooklyn College, New York University, The New School, Columbia University, and on the Brooklyn Campus of Long Island University, Bain currently teaches as a Visiting Lecturer for Harvard University’s Dramatic Arts Division.

 

 Toral_Gajarawala
 Toral Gajarawala
Associate Professor of English, Comparative Literature

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations I: Introduction to Literary Analysis and the Politics of Interpretation

Toral Gajarawala’s areas of teaching and research include theories of the novel and narrative, postcolonial studies, subaltern studies, and the relationship between aesthetics and politics. Recent essays include “Some Time between Revisionist and Revolutionary: Reading History in Dalit Fiction” (PMLA) and “Fictional Murder and Other Descriptive Deaths” (Journal of Narrative Theory). She is the author of Untouchable Fictions: Literary Realism and the Crisis of Caste (Fordham, 2012). Her current work considers the politics of postmodernism in the context of the Anglophone novel.

 

 George_Shulman
George Shulman
Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Course Taught – Cultural Foundations I: Critical Perspective on Justice Through Creative Writing

George Shulman’s interests lie in the fields of political thought and American studies. He teaches and writes on political thought in Europe and the United States, as well as on Greek and Hebrew traditions. His teaching and writing emphasize the role of narrative in culture and politics. He is the author of Radicalism and Reverence: Gerrard Winstanley and the English Revolution and American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture (2008). His most recent book, American Prophecy, was awarded the David Easton Prize in political theory. Focusing on the language that great American critics have used to engage the racial domination at the center of American history, American Prophecy explores the relationship of prophecy and race to American nationalism and democratic politics. Professor Shulman is a recipient of the 2003 NYU Distinguished Teaching Award.

 

Are you interested in teaching a course for PEP? Please complete our application and we’ll be in touch with information.